Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+)
Bookmark and Share

Related Information

 

Fungal arthritis

Definition

Fungal arthritis is infection of a joint by a fungus.

Alternative Names

Mycotic arthritis

Causes

Fungal arthritis, also called mycotic arthritis, is a rare condition. This disease can be caused by any of the invasive types of fungi. These organisms may affect bone or joint tissue. One or more joints may be affected, most often the large, weight-bearing joints, especially the knees.

Conditions that can cause fungal arthritis include:

The infection sometimes occurs as a result of an infection in another organ such as the lungs, and tends to get worse very slowly. The large joints are most often affected. People with weakened immune systems who travel or live in endemic areas are more susceptible to most causes of fungal arthritis.

For exserohilum rostratum arthritis, the major risk factor is injection with contaminated steroid vials.

Symptoms

Exams and Tests

Treatment

The goal of treatment is to cure the infection using antifungal drugs. The most commonly used antifungal drugs are amphotericin B or medications in the azole family (fluconazole, ketoconazole, or itraconazole).

Chronic or advanced bone or joint infection may require surgery (debridement) to remove the infected tissue.

Outlook (Prognosis)

What happens depends on the underlying cause of the infection and the patient's overall health. A weakened immune system, cancer, and certain medications can affect the outcome.

Possible Complications

Joint damage can occur if the infection is not treated right away.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call for an appointment with your health care provider if you have any symptoms of fungal arthritis.

Prevention

Thorough treatment of fungal infections elsewhere in the body may help prevent fungal arthritis.

References

Espinoza LR. Infections of bursae, joints, and bones. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 23rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 293.

Ohl CA. Infectious arthritis of native joints. In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2009:chap 102.


Review Date: 11/20/2013
Reviewed By: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
adam.com
 

Medical Care

Cancer
Pregnancy & Prenatal Classes
Weight Loss
Orthopedics
Heart Disease
Neurology
Women's Health
More Medical Care

Locations

Hospitals
Immediate Care
Health Centers
Emergency Room
Doctors Offices
Specialists
Affiliate Hospitals

Patients and Visitors

MyChart
Pay Your Bill
Request an Appointment
Get Healthy
Support Groups
Fitness Groups
Mobile Applications
Clinical Trials
Online Nursery
Classes and Events
Send an eCard
Patient Stories
Places to Stay

About Us

Quality Report 
Careers
Ways to Help
Community Outreach
Contact Us
(502) 629-1234

Connect with us

© 2014 Norton Healthcare
Serving Kentucky and Southern Indiana