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Eye
Eye


Entropion

Definition:

Entropion is the turning in of an edge of an eyelid, causing the lashes to rub against the eye. It most often is seen on the lower eyelid.



Causes:

Entropion can be present at birth (congenital).

In babies, it rarely causes problems because the lashes are very soft and do not easily damage the eye. In older people, the condition is most often caused by a spasm or weakening of the muscles surrounding the lower part of the eye.

Another cause can be trachoma infection, which can lead to scarring of the inner side of the lid. This is rare in North America and Europe. However, trachoma scarring is one of the three leading causes of blindness in the world.

Risk factors for entropion are:



Symptoms:

Symptoms include:



Exams and Tests:

In most cases, your health care provider can diagnose this condition by looking at your eyelids. Special tests are not often necessary.



Treatment:

Artificial tears can keep the eye from becoming dry and may help you feel better. Surgery to correct the position of the eyelids works well in most cases.



Outlook (Prognosis):

The outlook is most often good if the condition is treated before eye damage occurs.



Possible Complications:

Dry eye and irritation may increase the risk of:



When to Contact a Medical Professional:

Call your health care provider if:

If you have entropion, the following should be considered an emergency:

  • Decreasing vision
  • Light sensitivity
  • Pain
  • Eye redness that increases rapidly


Prevention:

Most cases cannot be prevented. Treatment reduces the risk of complications.

See your health care provider if you have red eyes after visiting an area where there is trachoma (such as North Africa or South Asia).



References:

Gigantelli JW. Entropion In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 4th ed. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 12.6.




Review Date: 11/2/2014
Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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