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Tick removal

Definition

Symptoms

While most ticks do not carry diseases, some ticks can cause:

Do Not

  • Do NOT try to burn the tick with a match or other hot object.
  • Do NOT twist the tick when pulling it out.
  • Do NOT try to kill, smother, or lubricate the tick with oil, alcohol, Vaseline, or similar material.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your doctor if you have not been able to remove the entire tick. Also call if in the days following a tick bite you develop:

  • A rash
  • Flu-like symptoms, including fever and headache
  • Joint pain or redness
  • Swollen lymph nodes

Call 911 if you have any signs of:

  • Chest pain
  • Heart palpitations
  • Increasingly severe headache which does not respond to medication
  • Paralysis
  • Severe headache
  • Trouble breathing

Prevention


  • Wear long pants and long sleeves when walking through heavy brush, tall grass, and thickly wooded areas.
  • Pull your socks over the outside of your pants to prevent ticks from crawling up your leg.
  • Keep your shirt tucked into your pants.
  • Wear light-colored clothes so that ticks can be spotted easily.
  • Spray your clothes with insect repellant.
  • Check your clothes and skin often while in the woods.

After returning home:

  • Remove your clothes. Look closely at all your skin surfaces including your scalp. Ticks can quickly climb up the length of your body.
  • Some ticks are large and easy to locate. Other ticks can be quite small, so carefully evaluate all black or brown spots on the skin.
  • If possible ask someone to help you examine your body for ticks.
  • An adult should examine children carefully.

References

Bolgiano EB, Sexton J. Tick-Borne Illnesses. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Mosby Elsevier; 2009:chap 132.

Traub, SJ, Cummins, GA. Tick-Borne Diseases. In: Auerbach, PS. ed. Auerbach: Wilderness Medicine. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA. Mosby Elsevier; 2011:chap 51.


Review Date: 1/1/2013
Reviewed By: Jacob L. Heller, MD, MHA, Emergency Medicine, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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