Pumpkin Chowder

It’s that time of year — we’re carving pumpkins for our Halloween festivities. Did you know Irish immigrants brought the pumpkin-carving tradition to America?

It’s that time of year — we’re carving pumpkins for our Halloween festivities. Did you know Irish immigrants brought the pumpkin-carving tradition to America? Using pumpkins as lanterns is based on an ancient Celtic custom.

So once you’ve carved your pumpkin, what do you do with the stuff inside? The seeds can be roasted for a snack, and the “meat” can be used to make soups, pies and breads. Pumpkin is highly nutritious. It’s low in calories, fat and sodium; high in fiber; and a good source of vitamins A and B, potassium, protein and iron.

Here’s a great recipe to warm your family as you get ready for the “trick-or-treaters” to arrive!

Pumpkin Chowder

1 cup yellow onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
1 cooking pumpkin (found in the produce section of the grocery; smaller and more tasty than a decorative pumpkin), insides removed and cut into chunks
6 cups water
2 tablespoons butter, unsalted
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1 tablespoon olive or canola oil

In a soup pot, heat oil over medium heat. Add onions and garlic. Cook until clear and soft. Add pumpkin and cook 5 minutes. Add water and bring to a boil; simmer until the pumpkin is soft, about 20 minutes. Remove the pumpkin from the liquid and remove the peel, then return to the liquid and transfer it all to a blender. Add seasoning, spices and butter; blend until smooth. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper. Serve hot.

Makes 8 servings. Serving size: 1 cup

Nutritional information

81 calories, 4.7 g fat, 0.92 g protein, 10.2 g carbohydrates, 2.86 g fiber, 82 mg sodium


Appointments

(502) 629-1234

Search our entire site.

Schedule an Appointment

Select an appointment date and time from available spots listed below.